Monday, 7 February 2011

The replica strycsitten of castle Loevestein

The castle of Loevestein in Poederooyen, the Netherlands is famous for the escape of Hugo de Groot in a book chest during the 80 years war. The castle claims to posess the original escape chest (however they are not alone in that claim). Inside the castle some fine reproduction medieval furniture can be found, made by 'Vakwerk in Hout' (http://www.vakwerkinhout.nl/index.html). One of the pieces  is a large strycsitten which is displayed (and used) in the entrance room. This strycsitten looks similar to that on the painting of St. Barbara by Robert Campin.

Usually you can only visit the castle by guided tour, but they were willing to let me stay in the rooms and take measurements and photo's at leasure.


Of course the strycsitten is positioned in front of the hearth. Is is approximately 2.5 meters long and needs the support of the extra legs in the middle, as well as the diagonal beams. 


The three legs at each side of the strycsitten rest upon a wooden frame. On both sides of the strycsitten are foot rests attached to the same frame. The strycsitten is constructed using mortise and tenon joints, secured by wooden pins.


The turnable backrest has a metal (bronze) cover. Also the turning arm is of metal.


The underside of the strycsitten shows that the legs are only connected to each other on top by a central beam and by the wooden frame on the floor. The seating boards are loose, i.e. not fixed to the strycsitten.


This photo gives you an impression of the amount of persons seating on this strycsitten


Drawing of the side measurements of the Loevestein strycsitten.



drawing of the front and bottom measurements of the strycsitten


 Scetch of the underside of the seating. The shaded part is cut out for the diagonal beam.




I thought I had measured everything of the strycsitten, unfortunately at home I discovered I had forgot some, e.g. the exact height. Using my photos, sizes of the floor tiles and my drawings I reverse engeneered the approximate missing measurements.

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